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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
arrived in new york one of the first things he did was to talk about international copyright law. he felt that writers were being cheated himself among them of their due earnings because copyright editors side with publishers. there was no international copyright law ever in america. his books were endlessly reprinted without him getting a penny. this was regarded... his statement on this was regarded as outrageous but the american press who denounced him instantly and said if that's all you've got to say go home. we don't want to know. we don't want you coming here and lecturing us on this. they believed that you could download anything from the internet free. the man had written a book and it was in the public domain. >> freedom is very interesting there because in some sense what he hated about america, what the people made too free with him this was the great land of opportunity, the great land of freedom. the grate democratic experiment. yet people were perhaps a little too familiar with hip. them didn't... he didn't like the fact that they treated him as an equal. that's very strang
. this was 1999 and i was like, well most of my friends miserable at their desk jobs working in sweet or law and i'm going to pursue something that i at least enjoy doing, and that was cooking. >> rose: you liked it? >> i liked it. >> rose: what did you like about it? >> that you could work with something and get better at it and sort of just taste and -- you're creating something, using your hands. it's something that was just the direct polar opposite of what i was doing in college or what i was being groomed to do which i had no idea. cooking was something i felt i had had an honor in. it was like a real craft. if i had more dexterity i would have been like a -- i don't know, a cooper or something like that. >> rose: or a surgeon. >> yeah, a surgeon. >> rose: (laughs) >> so you're -- you went about cooking and you got a series of jobs, including japan. >> yes. >> rose: and how influential was that? >> it was life changing. life changing. >> rose: life changing. >> yeah. i had a small stint teaching english in japan and i promised myself i'd go back to japan to do it right and to absorb the food
you think parole is freedom, parole as a dangerous man means you will be under the watch of the law forever-- forever. and we watch this extraordinary journey that jean valjean goes where this man has lost all kind of hope in humanity, and has building brutallized by the system, tries to survive and he steals some some silver from a bishop who is kind to him. and an amazingly the bisho bishop-- rather than putting him in it, says to the police oh, you know, this silver i gave it to him. and hugh's character has this extraordinary epiphany, a moment of spiritual conversion, a moment, a discovery of faith and basically commits himself to being, you know, a compassionate agent in the world and to changing the way he relates in the world. and completely reinvents himself. and we jump through time to discover this reinvention. >> rose: and who are you. >> i play, well, my character winds up being jean valjean's soul mirror. i play fontine a factory worker in his factory. at that time. he reinvented himself and event-- eventually becomes as tom said an agent for compassion. the town recog
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)